The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake

Wil je iets kwijt over Dr. Zahi Hawass, de Directeur-Generaal van het archeologisch instituut in Egypte, dan kan je dat hier.

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Nofret
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Lid geworden op: zo 03 apr 2005, 16:20

The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake

Bericht door Nofret » do 16 apr 2015, 12:39

Zahi Hawass: The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake !

It is very strange that these days we sometimes hear people appear suddenly to talk nonsense about famous objects in the Egyptian Museum. We have heard stories about the golden mask of Tutankhamun, for example, with some people claiming it is a fake. This of course is completely false.

More recently, an archaeologist from Italy, Francesco Tiradritti, who has been excavating and restoring tomb TT37, the Cenotaph of Harwa, near Thebes on the west bank of the Nile, told the publication Live Science that “Egypt’s Mona Lisa may be fake,” in reference to the ancient Egyptian painting of the Meidum Geese.

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The announcement is strange because Tiradritti is working in Egypt and he knows the law which states that any announcement or discovery has to be submitted first to the head of the antiquities department before it can be made public. I do not understand why Tiradritti said what he did without giving prior warning to the Ministry of Antiquities, instead of which he said the painting “may be fake.” Moreover, Tiradritti is an archaeologist and not an art historian, and therefore what he says about art should be questioned.

The painting of the Meidum Geese was found in 1871 in the tomb-chapel of Atet, or Itet, the wife of Prince Nefermaat, who was the son of the 4th Dynasty pharaoh Sneferu. The latter is believed to have ruled Egypt for 54 years and built four pyramids at Sila-Meidum and two in the Dahshur Necropolis.

The first two pyramids were built as step pyramids, but at the end of his reign Sneferu completed the Meidum pyramid as a true pyramid. The tomb of Nefermaat and Atet was built beside Sneferu’s pyramid at Meidum, and the painting of the Meidum Geese was found by an Italian artist called Luigi Vassalli who took the painting from the tomb and gave it to the Egyptian Museum.

In his interview, Tiradritti said that he had studied the painting for several months, and that he believed another painting could be hidden underneath the painting in the museum. However, if this were true this second painting could easily be detected using the new technology.

Tiradritti claimed that the geese shown in the painting were not known in Egypt at the time, with one of them, the bean goose, being from northern Spain, Greece and Turkey, and the other, the red-breasted goose, being from the Aegean coast of Greece and Turkey.

Tiradritti also said that the colours used in the painting, beige and mauve, were not used in Ancient Egypt. I do not fully understand what he said about the cracks in the painting, but I believe it was mostly speculation not backed up by evidence, including his comments about the Geese of Meidum being overpainted on another painting.

Tiradritti said that Vassalli was an artist and a curator at the Bulaq Museum in Cairo at the time and he wondered why Vassalli had not published the discovery. He said he thought Vassalli might have been looking for funding or been under pressure to find objects for the museum.

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I think Tiradritti has ignored many things here and has made some shameful comments in doing so. Many scholars who have made discoveries in Egypt never published their work, and I cannot believe that a curator in a museum would produce a fake and put it in the museum simply out of fun. Where were his curatorial colleagues? Where were the people who worked with him at the tomb? How could he have deceived all these people? We should also bear in mind that Egyptologist Auguste Mariette was in charge at the time, and he would have never allowed a fake to enter the Egyptian Museum.

Major ancient Egyptian artworks were discovered at the same time, including the beautiful statues of Rahotep and Nofret, as well as the Sheikh Al-Balad statue. If the painting were fake, its colours would be faded after almost 145 years, but this did not happen, which on the other hand proves that the Meidum geese is the work of Ancient Egypt. The fact is that major authorities like Grebaut, Schafer, Maspero, Rhone and Mariette all authenticated the painting.

Bron: http://www.drhawass.com/wp/the-meidum-g ... ot-a-fake/

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http://ancientegyptianmonuments.blogspot.nl/



nn ms.i sA.w -- No one is born wise.

Horus
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Lid geworden op: za 13 aug 2011, 10:51

Re: The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake

Bericht door Horus » do 16 apr 2015, 19:31

Gelukkig maar, stel je voor dat ze vals zouden zijn zeg *22
Zoals een eenvoudig gewaad het beste een mooie vrouw siert, zo is fatsoenlijk gedrag de beste versiering van innerlijke wijsheid.
Achnaton

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scarabee
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Lid geworden op: do 17 jul 2008, 19:23

Re: The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake

Bericht door scarabee » do 16 apr 2015, 20:13

Nog even en dan zeggen ze dat het graf van Toet en alle spullen ook vals zijn.
De piramides zijn tenslotte ook door aliens gebouwd!
Kijk ook eens op mijn Website: www.renedemila.123website.nl

Anna
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Lid geworden op: vr 29 nov 2013, 12:09

Re: The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake

Bericht door Anna » vr 17 apr 2015, 9:58

Altijd een "open mind" houden. Als Tirardritti claimt dat de schildering vals is, zal hij daar zijn redenen voor hebben. Er komt heus wel meer onderzoek naar - als het Cairo Museum tenminste wil meewerken. Want ik geloof er helemaal niets van dat dat fresco ooit minutieus is onderzocht. I.i.g. niet in Cairo!

Natuurlijk maakt Hawass nu een heleboel lawaai. Hij zou nl. mooi in zijn hemd staan als blijkt dat de schildering inderdaad een fake is. Zijn opmerking dat "Auguste Mariette nooit zou hebben geaccepteerd dat een fake het Bulaq Museum zou binnenkomen" is natuurlijk kul. We hebben ergens anders op dit forum al geconstateerd dat het in de verschillende musea miegelt van de fakes. En die zijn soms in de tijd van Mariette in de collecties opgenomen.

Nofret
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Lid geworden op: zo 03 apr 2005, 16:20

Re: The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake

Bericht door Nofret » vr 17 apr 2015, 10:16

The Meidum Geese Are Not A Fake – Part 2

In last week's editorial I introduced my counter-arguments to Francesco Tiradritti's theory that the Meidum Geese may be a fake. I would like now to publish the opinions of a number of colleagues on the subject. They are all famous archaeologists and art historians who are among the greatest experts when it comes to the art of the Old Kingdom. I believe that knowing their views will allow readers to understand better the debate.

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Prof. Karol Myśliwiec, Director of the Institute of Mediterranean and Oriental Cultures at the Polish Academy of Sciences, commented:

“Ignorance and arrogance turned out to be the best couple performing a dance called sensation. This is the only reflection that comes to one's mind while reading the comparison of an Egyptian painting representing geese to Mona Lisa. The conclusion drawn from this "extremely" accurate juxtaposition (what would Leonardo da Vinci say about it?) is "evident": the geese from Meydum are a fake.

Finding a fake evidently became a dream of some Egyptologists. Arguments are not important; important is the hunger of sensation characterizing particularly the readers who are not prepared for a personal analysis of art objects. Looking for an Ancient Egyptian "Mona", one should rather turn to masterpieces of painting and relief found in Old Kingdom tombs in Saqqara and New Kingdom tombs in Thebes.

Among the Old Kingdom examples, there is a rock-hewn chapel of the mastaba of vizier Merefnebef, discovered and published recently by the Polish-Egyptian archaeological mission west of the pyramid of Djoser. Not only the portraits of the tomb owner and his four consorts, decorating the walls of the chapel, but also a scene of fowling, preserving magnificent polychromy of various species of birds and other animals, as well as the representation of a shepherd with his large size geese, provide arguments for the authenticity of the Meydum painting. Concerning the identification of the various species of geese, based on their colours, particularly important is what Karol Myśliwiec concludes on p. 134 of his publication (K. Mysliwiec et all., The Tomb of Merefnebef, Saqqara I, Warsaw 2004, Text, p. 134): «The artist evidently seeks to satisfy two various requirements of his creation: a zoological exactness and variety of artistic expression. This may particularly be observed in the representations of two species that occur more frequently than any other ones: the Pied Kingfisher (e.g. in the Common Genet group), and the Egyptian goose (e.g. in the Egyptian Mongoose group). While the sober naturalistic colouring of the first bird is always very uniform, the colouristic diversity in the representations of the geese seems to first of all satisfy the artist's imagination.»”

Dr Edward Brovarski, an Egyptologist from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, said to me:

“I find Tiradritti’s summary of his article on the Meidum geese disconcerting. You might want to have a look at Ogden Goelet’s very interesting article on the painting in BES 5 (1983), pp. 41-60. He says the Bean goose and the Red-breasted goose are indeed quite rare in Egypt, but notes that a specimen of the latter was found in Egypt some time before 1930. Tiradritti’s point is that that the Red-breasted goose rarely winters as far south as the Aegean coast of Greece and Turkey. But Goelet provides that example, which shows the Red-breasted goose did on occasion migrate to Egypt.

Tiradritti thinks Vassali painted the Meidum geese. But, as he himself points out, Vassali makes no mention of the geese in his manuscripts despite the fact that ‘he used to mention his exploits even years after he made them.’ More to the point, why would Vassali depict a Red-breasted goose, which supposedly never winters in Egypt, since this would be a clear giveaway to anyone in the know that the painting was a modern forgery?”

Finally, Dr Richard Redding, from the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology of the University of Michigan, cleared any doubt I could have by saying:

“If you are further questioned on the authenticity of the Meidum geese, I thought you would like to know that the Bean goose was found in Egypt. Bones of the bean goose have been found at Ma'adi and Tell el-Daba'a. I have also identified 14 bones of the Bean goose from Giza and two Bean geese were found in the refuse of Tutankhamun's funerary meal.

The Red-breasted goose is a rare visitor to Egypt. It has been seen at Alexandria in 1874 and near Damietta in 1882. It has been so heavily hunted in the last two hundred years that its population is severely reduced as is its range.”

I hope the opinions of these experts shed light on the issue. I will keep readers posted if the debate further develops.

Zahi Hawass
http://ancientegyptianmonuments.blogspot.nl/



nn ms.i sA.w -- No one is born wise.

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