Tetisjeri

Onder deze periode vallen de Dynastien 13 tot en met 17.

Moderator: Thoetmosis XII

Plaats reactie
PahefimTjaat

Tetisjeri

Bericht door PahefimTjaat » ma 25 sep 2006, 18:35

Tetisheri, Tetisjeri of ook Woman B

Ouders Tjenna and Neferu getrouwd met Seqenenre Tao I
Waarschijnlijk kwam ze van een gewone burger familie, Ahmose heeft speciaal foor haar een beeld geplaats. Zie image below

Tetisheri was the matriarch of the Egyptian royal family of the late 17th Dynasty and early 18th Dynasty. She was the wife of Tao I Seqenenre, the mother of Tao II Seqenenre, and the grandmother of Kamose and Ahmose I.

Tetisheri was born to parents (Tjenna and Neferu) who held no hereditary or elite offices, and was selected by Tao I, despite her non-royal birth, to be not only his wife but his "Great Wife". Tao I granted Tetisheri many privileges not previously given to a queen. She became the first queen to wear the "Vulture Crown," which signalled that the position of "Great Wife" had become integral to pharaonic power. When her son Tao II rebelled against the Hyksos, Tetisheri may have played a role in maintaining order at the Theban court. Tao II was killed in battle and his successor Kamose possibly suffered a similar fate. Most likely, Tetisheri set a strong precedent for subsequent royal wives, including Ahhotep, the mother of Ahmose, who may have had a role in military activities against the Hyksos, and Ahmose-Nefertary, the first queen to receive the important priestly title of "God's Wife of Amun." It is likely that Tetisheri established the precedent for powerful female royalty in Dynasty 18 including Hatshepsut, a Royal Wife who became pharaoh, and Nefertiti, who seems to have held a position of particular importance in the royal court of Amarna. Little is known of the details of Tetisheri's life, however, and apart from a fragment of papyrus naming an endowment in her name in Lower Egypt, most conclusions drawn by scholars derive from speculation or from the little that can be gleaned from the monumental stela from Abydos dedicated in her name.

Her grandson Ahmose completed the expulsion of the Hyksos from Egypt. Ahmose had a memorial structure or cenotaph at Abydos erected in her honour, in the midst of his own extensive mortuary complex at that site. This mud brick structure was discovered in 1902 by the Egypt Exploration Fund, and was found to contain a monumental stela detailing the dedication by Ahmose and his sister-wife Ahmose-Nefertary of a pyramid and enclosure (or shrine) to Tetisheri. Its discoverer, C. T. Currelly, believed the textual reference to a "pyramid" of Tetisheri to refer not to the building in which the stela was found, but rather to the more imposing pyramid associated with a large mortuary temple at its base discovered in 1900 by A. C. Mace. Based on recent discoveries, however, this view can no longer be maintained. The foundations of the structure, originally described by C. T. Currelly in 1903 as a "shrine" or "mastaba," was demonstrated in 2004 through the renewed excavations of the Oriental Institute, University of Chicago under the direction of S. Harvey to have actually formed the lowest courses of a brick pyramid, the last queen's pyramid to have been built in Egypt. Portions of the limestone pyramidion or capstone were discovered as well, demonstrating conclusively that this structure was pyramidal in form. Magnetic survey also revealed a brick enclosure some 70 by 90 meters in scale, a feature not detected by earlier archaeologists. These accordingly may now be identified as the features described in Ahmose's stela found within: a pyramid and an enclosure, built in the midst of Ahmose's own mortuary complex. The text also indicates that Tetisheri possessed an additional cenotaph or memorial feature at Abydos (location unknown), as well as her actual tomb at Thebes. No tomb at Thebes has yet been conclusively identified with Queen Tetisheri, though a mummy that may be hers was included among other members of the royal family reburied in the Royal Cache (DB 320). A statuette long in the collections of the British Museum bearing an inscription naming Tetisheri was identified as a forgery by W. V. Davies, based on the slavish imitation of its inscription from a fragmentary lower portion of a similar statue of the queen (now lost). However, some scholars question this attribution, and have raised questions as to the potential authenticity of the statuette itself, if not the inscription.




Afbeelding






Afbeelding

Satiah

Sitdjehuti

Bericht door Satiah » zo 29 okt 2006, 2:44

Van Ahhotep is bekend dat ze de dochter van Tetisheri is en mogelijk ook Ahmose-Inhapi/ Thenthapi. Maar laatst kwam ik op een website nog eentje tegen.

Sitdjehuti


Een Fragment van haar 'Rishi'-kist is te zien in het Staatliches Museum Ägyptischer Kunst. Aan de binnenkant van de kist wordt ze genoemd:


"Koningsdochter (en) koningszuster Satdjehuti, genaamd Satibu, de rechtvaardige, geboren uit de Koningsgemalin Teti-sheri."

Ook staan er delen van het dodenboek in: Dodenboekspreuken 124, 83, 84 en 85.

De kist staat vermeld in catalogue: Im Zeichen des Mondes by Schoske & Grimm 1999

Al wordt Sit-djehuti niet koningsvrouw genoemd, het grootste gedeelte van de kist ontbreekt dan ook.
Grimm identificeerd haar als vrouw van Seqenenre en moeder van prinses Ahmose die begraven is in tomb QV 47. Die in haar tombe wordt vermeld als koningsdochter en koningszuster.

In "The British museum" staat een mummiemasker ook van een satdjehuti, geschonken door Ahmose-Nefertari. Misschien is die ook wel van haar?!


Mummy mask of Satdjehuty

From Thebes, Egypt
Early 18th Dynasty, about 1500 BC



It is rare to find burial equipment from the early Eighteenth Dynasty (about 1550-1295 BC), and a piece in such superb condition is extremely rare. The burial of Satdjehuty was discovered around 1820. It probably originally consisted of at least a coffin, the mummy, a heart scarab, this mummy mask and a quantity of linen. Only the mask and linen are in the British Museum.

We learn from the mass of linen that it was given to Satdjehuty 'in the favour of the god's wife, king's wife, and king's mother Ahmose-Nefertari'. Ahmose-Nefertari was the wife of Ahmose I (1550-1525 BC), the first king of the Dynasty, and the mother of Amenhotep I (1525-1504 BC), with whom she subsequently became associated as local deities. That Satdjehuty should have received such an honour shows she was a lady of the highest rank.

The winged head-dress on this mask is a feature found on funerary headpieces and coffins in the Second Intermediate Period (about 1750-1650 BC), and perhaps denotes protection of the deceased by a deity.



Height: 33 cm




Acquired in 1880


EA 29770


Afbeelding

Afbeelding

Sa-Bastet

Bericht door Sa-Bastet » zo 29 okt 2006, 9:31

Afbeelding


echt een prachtig beeld!! heb echter nog nooit gezien dat de Egyptenaren daadwerkelijk het steen weghaalden, waar eigenlijk niets hoorde, zoals in dit geval bij het haar.

Gebruikersavatar
hans.hutting
Vizier
Berichten: 1828
Lid geworden op: zo 21 mei 2006, 11:48

Bericht door hans.hutting » zo 29 okt 2006, 10:34

Sa-Bastet schreef:
Afbeelding


echt een prachtig beeld!! heb echter nog nooit gezien dat de Egyptenaren daadwerkelijk het steen weghaalden, waar eigenlijk niets hoorde, zoals in dit geval bij het haar.
dat klopt sa deeden ze aleen bij zachten matrialen zo als hout maar nooit bij steen maar het is echt een schiterend beeld
Nehes,Nehes Nehes Nehes em Hotep Nehes em neferu Nebet hotepet Weben en hotep Weben en Neferu Nutjert en ankh Nefer em pet Pet em hotep Ta em hotep Nutjert sat Nut Sat Geb, merit Ausar Nutjert asha renu Anekh brak Anekh brak Tu a atu Tu a atu Nebet Aset

Sa-Bastet

Bericht door Sa-Bastet » zo 29 okt 2006, 17:33

ja inderdaad, bij hout is het iets bekender, maar bij steen... ook heel gevaarlijk aangezien je zo makkelijk bij de maak het beeld zou kunnen verpesten.

als het echt is, is het wel mooi dat er door de eeuwen heen niets van is afgebroken van het haar, zoals je wel vaak ziet bij bijvoorbeeld de cobra's op de kronen van de Koninklijke Familie.

Gebruikersavatar
hans.hutting
Vizier
Berichten: 1828
Lid geworden op: zo 21 mei 2006, 11:48

Bericht door hans.hutting » zo 29 okt 2006, 19:51

Sa-Bastet schreef:ja inderdaad, bij hout is het iets bekender, maar bij steen... ook heel gevaarlijk aangezien je zo makkelijk bij de maak het beeld zou kunnen verpesten.

als het echt is, is het wel mooi dat er door de eeuwen heen niets van is afgebroken van het haar, zoals je wel vaak ziet bij bijvoorbeeld de cobra's op de kronen van de Koninklijke Familie.
nou zij heeft een gier kap op maar het hoofd van de gier die is wel afgebrooken er zijn wel een paar beeden trouwens waar alles los is en niet een stuk is
Nehes,Nehes Nehes Nehes em Hotep Nehes em neferu Nebet hotepet Weben en hotep Weben en Neferu Nutjert en ankh Nefer em pet Pet em hotep Ta em hotep Nutjert sat Nut Sat Geb, merit Ausar Nutjert asha renu Anekh brak Anekh brak Tu a atu Tu a atu Nebet Aset

Plaats reactie

Terug naar “Tweede Tussen Periode / Second Intermediate Period.”